Category Archives: Books

In Search of the Self #BookBytes -2

The Liberation of Sita

For #BookBytes this week, I have here an excerpt from The Liberation of Sita by Volga. This short read, packs quite a feminist punch. In this passage Ahilya talks to Sita, telling her to find her own self.

You means you, nothing else. You are not just the wife of Rama. There is something more in you, something that is your own. No one counsels women to find out what that something more is. If men’s pride is in wealth, or valour, or education, or caste-sect, for women it lies in fidelity, motherhood. No one advises women to transcend that pride. Most often, women don’t realise that they are part of the wider world. They limit themselves to an individual, to a household, to a family’s honour. Conquering the ego becomes the goal of spirituality for men. For women, to nourish that ego and to burn themselves to ashes in it becomes the goal.

#BookBytes

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If you stumble upon a quote, a line (or two) or even a passage that leaps out at you demanding to be shared don’t ignore it. Share it on your blog.

Leave a link to your blogpost in the comments and I’ll drop by and also share it in my next week’s post.

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Dear ______ ,

letter

All day today I have struggled to write this letter. It’s not that I don’t have anything to say, neither is it about being able to find the words to say what I have to. The trouble this time round is rather strange – I don’t know who I should be writing this letter to. Who is it that made me want to write? Who is it that continues to inspire me?

Should it be my grade I English teacher who told my dad I needed to read storybooks because my English wasn’t up to the mark or my class VII English teacher who taught me to appreciate Shakespeare making me mug up speeches from Merchant of Venice till I could recite them verbatim (I can still reel off My Mind is Tossing on the ocean.. and The quality of mercy is not strained..)?

Should it be Enid Blyton who made me fall in love with talking toys, magical trees and mysterious islands or should it JK Rowling who reminded me that magic wasn’t only for children?

Should it be Georgette Heyer whose style I copied, without even being aware of it, in the first story I ever wrote (and tore up right away) or should it be PG Wodehouse who still appears unwittingly in some of my writing?

Should it be the editor of the daily who picked me for my very first job even though I had no experience or should it be the one who accepted my first story?

Should it be my twin muses who inspired me to begin a blog and then later, pestered me to come with a new story every night for years on end and then listened to them so spellbound that I began to believe a little bit in myself? Or should it be friends who laughed at all the right places when they read my writing?

Should it be my mom, dad and sister who read what I write, come up with ideas when I’m stuck, even vet some of my posts, or should it be my fantastic blogging family that keeps me going day after day with kind words of encouragement?

I shall never know and for that reason this letter shall never be written.

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Written for the Write Tribe Festival of Words June 2018 for the Day 6 prompt:

Write a letter to a person who supported your writing career, whether that be a friend, a family member, a teacher (even one that supported you at a very young age before you knew that it would blossom into a writing career), an author you’ve never met but have been inspired…


Write Tribe

Linking up with Shantala’s #ChattyBlogs.

 

Books and Memories

reading childhood

Books and reading formed a huge part of my childhood and for that I shall always be grateful. I had no clue then, that my stolen moments with this favourite hobby would one day offer me a second chance at a career.

To our extreme good fortune our father was friends with the owner of Universal , the biggest bookshop of the city back then. So we would get brand new books on loan, to be read and returned. I lost myself in those large glossy pages or the super glamorous pop-up books. I had one of Goldilocks that I haven’t been able to get over even now. Reading them once always left me wanting more. I didn’t want to let them go. I wanted to keep them with me forever.

Perhaps that’s where the itch to buy and own books was born.

Between our school and home lay the poshest market of the city with our dream bookstore. Hobby Corner. Nope, this wasn’t the one that belonged to our father’s friend but another one that sold books and then bought them back, at a small discount.

So some days (and I hope the children never ever read this bit) we’d sneak off the school bus mid-way, my sister and I, and we’d go to this book shop and indulge ourselves. Those days we didn’t have helpers in the bus to keep an eye on us so it must have been easier. Even so, this was a rare treat because we hardly ever had any money – even the two or three rupees that we would have had to pay up. Besides, there was also the issue of getting back home without the bus (for which we had a pass) and that also meant money for private transport. We managed it on some very lucky days and our parents never knew.

Long summer holidays were painful because with no access to the school library we were left bookless. Lending libraries were a dream in our city back then. Once we heard of one close by and I jumped and joined it only to find it was one of those that only stocked books on subjects like ‘meditation’ and ‘finding the true meaning of life’. I have nothing against all of that, but it most definitely wasn’t what my young teen self was looking for dreaming as it was of Heathcliff and Rhet Butler and the like.

I never did develop a taste for non-fiction.

In hindsight, I remain grateful for each of those childhood memories. Books and reading became that much more precious. Each time the Amazon delivery person knocks at my door even today, I get a happy thrill. While I constantly bemoan the lack of space in the house, I never want to part with my books, nor put them away in cartons, as the Husband once suggested. *Shudder*.

What are your earliest reading memories?

*************

Linking up with Amrita for #ThankfulThursdays.

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And also with  with Tina’s Mommynificent for the Booknificent Link-Up
Booknificent-Thursdays

The Reader

Beat About The Book - fictionThe reader

Craft class was in progress. Forty girls sat on either side of a long table bent diligently over their embroidery frames. At the head of the table sat Ms Mathew, The Dragon. That’s what the students called her, for she breathed fire at the littlest opportunity.

Did I say 40? Well, I meant 39, for the 40th girl was not quite there. Sara sat right at the end of the table, with her head bent like the others, except she had no embroidery frame. On her lap rested an Enid Blyton and she was far far away in a land where a gorgeous tale was beginning to unfold.

DEAR BESSIE, FANNY, JO AND DICK,
We know that you don’t want any more adventures just yet, but you might like to know that there is a most exciting land at the top of the Faraway Tree just now.  It is the Land of Do-As-You-Please, even nicer than the Land of Take-What-You-Want. We are going there tonight.  If you want to come, come just before midnight and you can go with us.  We will wait for you till then.
Love from SILKY AND MOON-FACE

Midnight! This sounded dangerous… and exciting.

Oh go go go! urged Sara as she read on, her eyes shining brighter than those of the kids in the story. ‘The Land of Do-As-You-Please!! Wow! I’d eat honey pops and read all day‘, thought she turning over the page.

Of course the children decided to go – down the garden, through the lane, into the Enchanted Wood. Their torches shone in the moonless night. The forest was silent. Ominously so. Wisha wisha wisha whispered the mysterious trees.

An owl squealed and something ran across their feet.

The kids jumped and so did Sara, upsetting her neighbour, who pricked her finger, dropped her needlework and squealed louder that any owl ever could.

Tiny drops of blood were beginning to blot her young neighbour’s lemon yellow runner and before Sara could apologise she bawled, “OUCH Miss.. Sara pushed me and I hurt my hand, it’s bleeeeeding.”

O get on with it drama queen!‘ thought Sara, the apology dying on her lips, ‘It’s just a tiny prick for goodness sake!

She did try to look contrite but The Dragon was already bearing down upon them. Sara glanced at the book in her hand. Too late she realised she had no embroidery frame. Her heart sank right into her shoes. She would be caught red-handed.

**************

I need to put in a few apologies: One to Enid Blyton for taking liberties with her writing. And two to Bernhard Schlink, for borrowing the title of his book although there is nothing similar between the two tales except perhaps, a love for the written word.

It’s Day 4 of the #BarAThon Challenge from 1st to 7th August 2016.
The prompt for today is ‘Caught Red Handed’.

I am with Team #CrimsonRush

BAR-A-THON

Why I Write – Essays by Saadat Hasan Manto – A Review

Why I write – Essays by Saadat Hasan Manto
Edited and translated by Aakar Patel

manto

I’ve been putting off this review for quite a while now. Not because the book was a tough one to read but because it wasn’t my kind and I am not sure how to review it.

One: This is a translation – which I’m not fond of. Language I feel, is a part of the story and that is often lost in translation.Or so I thought.

And two This was titled ‘Essays by Sadat Hasan Manto’.. essays? For me E.S.S.A.Y. spells B.O.R.I.N.G. Consider it a hangover from school.

This book served to dispel both those myths. I do continue to suspect though, that it would have read much better in the original Urdu. But then that might be because even if I do not know the language too well I remain partial to it.

The Book..

… is a collection of articles by Manto that appeared in various publications over a number of years. They have been edited and translated by Aakar Patel. I have no way of knowing how much of the original has been retained but Manto’s thoughts certainly shine through.

The amazing thing about this book is that he wrote these articles (I prefer to call them that rather than essays) over six decades ago and yet they are more relevant than ever. It makes one think that either Manto had precognitive powers or that things really haven’t changed over the years or perhaps we did make progress only to regress again.

Manto picks varied topics from something like surviving in the Indian film industry (he wrote scripts for Bollywood, none of which were very successful) bumming cigarettes from friends and eve teasing to politics, politicians and partition riots. He wrote of his struggles with poverty and his inability to support his family as also of his brush with the law – he was tried a number of times for obscenity. Not once does he sound desperate or depressed. He writes with humour and a sharp satirical voice.

The ones I loved

One of my favourites was Hindi or Urdu  where he sets up a dialogue between a Munshi Narayan Prasad and a Mirza Mohammad Iqbal each making a case for their language. The futility of the argument shines through in the dialogue. He adds: Languages are not created, they make themselves and no human effort can destroy one already made. He reduces issues like Arms Control to a hilariously simplistic level in his piece How Arms Control works. Another one I liked was What Bollywood must do. It  is amazingly applicable today. Sample this India needs entertaining movies that also educate, exercise the mind and introduces us to new ideas and new thinking.

I saved up my favourite one for the last – God is Gracious in Pakistan – a brilliant piece of satire where he professes relief that artists, poets, painters, musicians and even scientists had all been done away with for, Creation, as he says is the preserve of Allah. He is incisive in this derision of the Government that blocks out creativity.

How we need writers like him.

******

I wracked my brains thinking where I had heard of Manto before till it came to me that actor Naseeruddin Shah did a reading of his famous short story Toba Tek Singh – another masterful satire. Here’s a link if you want to listen to it.

The ghost who walks

Phantom

The Phantom in action with his horse Hero and his wolf Devil.

Remember Phantom, anyone? The great daddy of all superheros? If you’ve grown up in the India of the 80s you certainly would have encountered him in the pages of The Illustrated Weekly or the daily newspaper. You would know him as Vetaal in Hindi. Wiki tells me that at the peak of its popularity, the strip was read by over 100 million people each day.

How he was made

If you’ve joined the human race later and are unaware of this great mystery man, he was fighting evil way before Spiderman, FYI. He was born in 1936 and the strip is still going on in 2015. Boggles the mind, doesn’t it? He was created by Lee Falk (who also created Mandrake the Magician). Phantom survived his creator’s death (in 1999) and is now produced by new writers and artists. I for one will always associate Phantom with Lee Falk.

Five Phantom facts

  1. When young sailor Christopher Walker’s father is killed by pirates he takes a vow on his father’s skull to rid the world of crime. And that’s how Phantom was born.
  2. He is believed to be immortal. The baton of superheroism passes from father to son so seamlessly that people never get to know when the old phantom is gone and the new one has taken his place. The current phantom is the 21st Phantom.
  3. Falk said his skin-tight costume was inspired by Robin Hoods green tights.
  4. He lives in a Skull Cave in Africa in a fictional country called Bangalla. He has many other houses including a tree house, an Isle of Eden and a castle.

phantom skull cave

phantom ring

5. Oh and this I must tell you – he wears two rings and leaves their mark – a skull (from the ring he wears on his right hand) for the bad people and the four sabres mark (from the ring on his left hand) on the good people who remain in his protection. Another bit of trivia – the Skull ring is supposed to be made from the nail that hung Jesus to the cross.

Five reasons why I love him

  1. The obvious one first – He’s a superhero – brave and indestructible, stranding up for the weak and fighting the bad people. What’s not to like?
  2. He’s romantically tantalizingly mysterious. You never get to see him really properly. He hides behind that hideous purple mask (Why Purple????). All you get are rare glimpses of half a profile or his back. And in your imagination you make him perhaps much more handsome than any man can ever be.
  3. He is real. Well as real as a superhero can get. He has no special powers. No spider senses tell him of brewing trouble. He gets and gives news through the Jungle patrol – tribal drummers. His best assets are his own strength and the undying loyalty of Devil and Hero.
  4. He has a love story too. He falls in love with Diana Palmer who he met during his college days. He later goes on to marry her.
  5. He’s a family man!! Yeah he has a wife Diana Palmer and twins (Yess!!) Kit and Heloise. A superhero dad – how adorable!

**********

Linking up to ABC Wednesday the fun weekly alphabetical challenge where I’m picking up a character each week to talk about.

abc 17 (1)

Rendezvous with Obelix

On Beat About the Book (BAB) blog today we have an interview with the most famous sidekick of all time – Obelix – the mustachioed, pigtailed loveable Gaul, best friend of Asterix. You may already know that when he was a baby he fell into a cauldron of magic potion giving him superhuman strength. That potion seems to have also endowed him with a klutzy endearing innocence. We bet you didn’t know that a survey of adolescent girls voted him the ‘sexiest’ Gaul of all time.

We have a breakfast appointment with him this morning and we find him chomping his way through a whole wild boar, a growing pile of licked-clean bones by his side.

Quintessential Obelix

Quintessential Obelix

BAB: Good morning Mr Obelix.
Obelix: Mornin’.

BAB: Would it be much trouble for you to put down that boar for a bit?
Obelix(Glaring): Don’t you come between the boar and me! Fire away. What is this about?

Obelix at breakfast

Obelix at breakfast

BAB: Well you agreed to be a guest on the blog here, remember? We need you to answer a few questions.
Obelix: Ask Asterix. He’s the talker, the one with brains.

BAB: And you? You’re the one with brawn?
Obelix: (Flexing his muscles) Yeah right.

BAB: You’ve been known to break down doors when you knock at them. Once you gave Asterix amnesia when you hit him on the head. Is it hard remembering that you’re this strong? Does it feel strange being so Big and Fa… err Strong. Doesn’t…
Obelix: WHAT??? Were you going to say Fat? Who’s Fat? WHO. IS. FAT. HERE?

BAB: Strong.. I said strong. And brave – the strong and brave Roman basher.
Obelix: (Calming down right away, a beatific smile lighting up his face) Ah yes the Romans! I love ’em… though they’re not too good at our fight-game. Keep losing. Need more practice, I figure. Once I had this nightmare they were leaving. Imagine that! What life that would be, with no Romans to clobber! I’d likely die of boredom. Some folks believe they invaded us. Heck it was we who dragged ’em here for a bit of sport.

Obelix the brave.

Obelix the brave.

BAB: So what do you do for a living?
Obelix: You still need to ask? You slow or what? I beat up Romans Duh! And (thrusting a chunk of meat in our face) I hunt and eat wild boar for living and oh I make and trade menhirs.

Obelix at work on a menhir.

Obelix at work on a menhir.

BAB: Menhirs? What do people do with them?
Obelix: Buy ’em of course! Maan, you’re slow.

BAB: I meant what do they do with them after they buy them?
Obelix: Whatever they please. I sell ’em, what people do with ’em after that ain’t much o’ my business.

BAB: Mr Obelix we’ve heard you’re quite the ladies man. You seem to fall in love quite often.
Obelix: (Blushing) Well I’m a ‘motional kinda man and the girls move my heart. I’m quite a hit with ‘em too. That Panacea’s a beaut and also Mrs Geritrix. Her husband though is another story – crusty old blah.

BAB: What according to you is a perfect life?
Obelix: Boars to hunt, a bunch of Romans to play with, Asterix and Dogmatix by my side and life is perfect.

Linking up to ABC Wednesday the fun alphabetical meme. We’re at the letter O.

abc 17 (1)