Tag Archives: David Walliams

The World’s Worst Children 3 #Review

Book Title: The World’s Worst Children 3
Author: David Walliams

Here is a book that’s quintessentially David Walliams. What? Haven’t read Walliams yet? Well then, this is a good place to start.

The World’s Worst Children 3, is the third book (obviously!) in this series of the terriblest children you’re ever going to meet. There are ten short stories about ten terrors. Walliams imbues his protagonists with one troublesome flaw after another, building up their ‘atrocities’ till you’re clamouring for an end. Of course the end comes and in the most traditional, old-fashioned way.

There’s Walter the Wasp with a tongue that spews insults, there’s Hanks Pranks who can’t help but play pranks, there’s Boastful Barnabus who cannot stop boasting and a host of others. They offer a bunch of laughs as they trouble, tease and torment finally meeting their just desserts, leaving a lesson for young readers.

Some stories hit the spot to perfection. For instance there was Honey the Hogger – the tale of a girl who hogs the loo making her brother squirm when he needs to pee. This could have been lifted straight from my home. Oh and Kung Fu Kylie was a bit of a wicked winner, delivering a chop to her Geography teacher for giving her an F. That’s something I’d definitely not propagate, but the appeal to kids is undeniable.

This is the kind of book a child can open at any page and begin to read. Replete with delightful alliterations, it makes for a fun adventure, even though my children are a little over age for it. The illustrations by Tony Ross are gorgeous and the glossy pages add to its good looks.

Walliams picks up Dahl’s formula of strong children as protagonists set off by rather weak adults and takes it forward with élan. As an adult I have enjoyed a few of his books (The Boy in the Dress) while some others I have found over-the-top. I give three stars to this particular collection because it offered some laughs yet had nothing new to offer and not much of a storyline either. Also, I really have to mention, that the first story, The Terrible Triplets, had me gagging. But that’s my point of view as an adult.

As a mom to twins, I do know that children have a whole different reaction to all things gross and are rarely as freaked out as adults. They also seem to revel in repetitions laughing over passages just as hard each time as they had the very first time they read it. For them the book is a winner.

It provided us with a welcome change during the rather stressful exam season.

Last thought: I’ll put this one down as a fun read for children.

Disclaimer: I was given a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

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What’s the deal with Walliams, Allen and the like?

Some of my favourite childhood buddies lived up among the dense branches of a tree that went Wisha Wisha Wisha. Silky, Moonface, the Saucepanman and Dame Washalot. Eager to have the kids befriend them too I picked up this book at the Landmark store.

Blyton copy

Once I brought it home, however, I realised it wasn’t an Enid Blyton at all. It was written by Elise Allen.

I felt cheated.

I have to add here that I looked up Elise Allen and she’s done some pretty good work – she’s the lady behind shows like the Dinosaur Train and Sid the Science Kid (Strongly recommend the Dinosaur Train if you have a dino-loving kid) and many more works that the children have enjoyed. So why should she do an Enid Blyton take off and why oh why should the book be packaged like an original?

Then again I stumbled upon David Walliams. Not only are the covers of his books replicas of Roald Dahl’s, he also has the same illustrator, Quentin Blake. He is a self-confessed Dahl fan and his writing style is quite the same too. He has the same mean-adult-pitted-against-the-child formula and has perfected Dahl’s craziness to a tee.

david-walliams-books

 

I have to admit I actually liked The Boy in the Dress (it beautifully challenged stereotypes and I recommend it for all 10-year-olds, specially boyish boys) but a lot of the others, Demon Dentist and Mr Stink for instance, are just too much like Dahl, minus his finesse, or so I thought. It might just be my bias speaking of course because each time I see his books my head screams ‘IMPERSONATOR’. The kids love him, though – the proof is in the fact that his books have made him into a gazillionire.

Sample this quote from one of his interviews:

“I had absolutely no hesitation in stealing this idea for my new children’s novel, Mr Stink, when introducing my characters. Nor was that the only thing I stole. I also stole Quentin Blake to illustrate my writing.”

He was nominated for the Dahl Funny Book Award and is hailed as the new Roald Dahl but the thing is why do we need a new one?

Then I chanced upon my niece reading a young adult fiction series by Kiera Cass – The Selection Series. Never one to be able to resist a book I picked it up only to find it was Hunger Games with a twist. A repressed majority, a strict caste system (like the districts in Hunger Games) and a bunch of girls drawn from the varied sections coming together at the King’s palace to vie for the Prince.

kiera

She loved it, though. She had the entire series on her bookshelf. And I’m not sure she’d like Hunger Games as much because this one pandered to her every adolescent girly instinct. Which just doesn’t seem fair to me. Not that it matters, since I am not exactly their target market.

I’d love to know your thoughts. Am I the only one stewing in annoyance? Is this set to be a trend that’s going to be loved and accepted just like remixed music or remade films?