Tag Archives: Me Before You

On Loving Your Children #BookBytes 10

It’s time for BookBytes and I’m doing something I’ve not done before – sharing two quotes instead of one. In my defence – they share a theme, and the first one reminded me of the second.

The first is from Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng, which I read recently. It’s a wonderful book – just the kind I like. It talks of a family, two families actually, and the fascinating ways the characters’ lives intertwine – the way they connect and affect each other. Here’s the quote I picked.

To a parent, your child wasn’t just a person: your child was a place, a kind of Narnia, a vast eternal place where the present you were living and the past you remembered and the future you longed for all at the same time. You could see it every time you looked at her: layered in her face was the baby she’d been and the child she’d become and the adult she would grow up to be, and you saw them all simultaneously, like a 3-D image. It made your head spin. 

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng

There’s so much love in this quote. How beautifully it depicts what a child means to a parent! It reminded me of another quote from another one of my favourite books – Me Before You by Jojo Moyes. The book will remain with me forever as a bit of heartache.

“It’s just that the thing you never understand about being a mother, until you are one, is that it is not the grown man – the galumphing, unshaven, stinking, opinionated off-spring – you see before you, with his parking tickets and unpolished shoes and complicated love life. You see all the people he has ever been all rolled up into one.
I look at him and see the baby I held in my arms, dewing besotted, unable to believe that I’d created another human being. I see the toddler, reaching for my hand, the schoolboy weeping tears of fury after being bullied  by some other child. I saw the vulnerabilities, the love, the history.” 

Me Before You by Jojo Moyes

This is perhaps why parents find it so hard to separate themselves from their children, why they forgive them so easily, why they’re ready to face the worst odds for them. In their heads they see the baby, the toddler, the teen in a grown man/woman.

Agree?

Picture Credit: Pexels

***********

If you stumble upon a quote, a line (or two) or even a passage from a book that leaps out at you demanding to be shared join in with #BookBytes.

Here’s what you have to do:

  • Share it on your blog and link back to this latest post.
  • Put in the logo (above) so it’s easy to spot.
  • Leave the link to your blogpost in the comments so I can drop by too.
  • Book Bytes goes live every 1st and 3rd Tuesday of the month. Do join in.

The next edition is scheduled for July 2nd.

Me Before You – A Review

Heloooo everyone. This place has been quiet, too quiet too long. I’ve been away and I’ve been reading. Remember I told you I was gifted a kindle? Let me just say that I’ve been putting it to very very good use.

I have a bunch of books to review and I begin today with my personal favourite:

Me Before You by Jojo Moyes

059f38a0-b3b6-0133-b37e-0e438b3b98d1

Me before You is the story of Louisa Clark and Will Traynor.

The story

Lou Clark is an ‘ordinary girl leading an ordinary life’ with the only distinction of having a weird dress sense and of putting her crazily clad foot right into her mouth. She has worked most of her adult life at the tiny Buttered Bun Cafe buttering bread and serving tea but she isn’t bored or tired. She loves being there. She finds her ordinary life comfortable and happy. But then the cafe closes down and she is hired by the very wealthy Camilla Traynor to take care of her quadriplegic son.

She’s definitely not looking forward to the ‘bum wiping’.

As it turns out bum wiping might have been the easy bit. Will Traynor was an active, successful businessman till a road accident confines him to a wheelchair. Now, he is unkempt, angry and very daunting.

What follows is a story of these two people.

The Review

Everything about this book is a cliche. The rich-boy-poor-girl story, a dysfunctional family, the crabby quadriplegic, the cheerful carer and a romance… well almost.

But my God the way it is told – that’s where the magic lies – in the telling. And the telling is flawless. I fell in love with the snarky Will and the quirky Loiusa. I felt his helplessness, his desperation, her hope and her loss.

It’s funny and sweet and heartbreaking. It might make you cry but not in the way of run-of-the-mill weepies. You know those ones, don’t you? The ones that are written with the specific intent of making the reader cry? A bit like Nicholas Sparks. This is nowhere like that.

Unlike what the cover might lead you to believe it is not all about romance, which is  incidental rather than central. The story is more about  finding oneself, stepping out of one’s comfort zone and making the most of one’s life. It is about evaluating and examining choices, of doing with your life, what you want. I might not agree with all of it but I loved it, all of it.

The film is due to be out soon and I do hope they don’t spoil it. This one is a tale beautifully told. Read it I say. Read it if you have a bit of a romantic in you.